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January 20, 2003
Volume 81, Number 03
CENEAR 81 03 pp. 43-45
ISSN 0009-2347


FACES OF THE FUTURE
Project SEED announces 30 new scholarships for freshmen in chemistry

The ACS Committee on Project SEED has announced 2002–03 college scholarships to former Project SEED students who have demonstrated a high potential for success in chemistry through excellence in the laboratory and academics. These scholarships are made possible through donations to the Project SEED program that were matched by the ACS Matching Gift Fund.

Project SEED was established in 1968 to encourage economically disadvantaged students to pursue careers in the sciences. It provides students the opportunity to conduct hands-on research with scientists in colleges, universities, industry, and government. The scholarships are intended to assist former SEED participants in their transition from high school to college and consist of up to $5,000 each for tuition and fees required for enrollment in a science or engineering field, such as chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry, materials science, or other chemistry-related major during the student's freshman year. The scholarship is a one-year nonrenewable award.

To be eligible for a Project SEED scholarship, students in high school must have completed a chemistry course, met income requirements, and obtained a recommendation from their high school teacher. And they must have worked at least one summer at a science institute under the auspices of Project SEED. The scholarships are restricted to students who plan to major in a chemical science or engineering field.

BADER SCHOLARS

Alfred Bader is one of the founders of Aldrich Chemical Co., now Sigma-Aldrich. He and his wife, Isabel Bader, have generously contributed to Project SEED over the years and supported the start of the program's Summer II component. This year, they sponsored 20 scholarships.

Chandra Americhetty of Jersey City, N.J., is a student at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J. Constantine Neagu of Amersham Pharmacia Biotech was her mentor while she was a Summer II student. Americhetty's research project was titled "Synthesis of -Thiodeoxyadenosine Triphosphate."

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Chantell Bowman of Philadelphia is attending Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y. Militza Ausmanas of the Forensics Mentors Institute was her Summer II mentor. Bowman's research project involved the use of scanning electron microscopy to check contamination in patients exposed to selenium.

Miriam Chapman of Alpine, N.Y., is attending Roberts Wesleyan College, Rochester, N.Y. Cornell University's Lynn Whited was Chapman's mentor while she was a Summer II Scholar. Her research project was titled "Investigation of the Use of a Chemical Signal To Determine the Light Oxidation of Milk."

Bridgett Coleman, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, attends Ball State University, Muncie, Ind. David Hart of Ohio State University was Coleman's Summer II mentor. Coleman's research project was titled "Synthesis of Monoacylglycerols."

Jocelyn Coleman of Edison, N.J., is a freshman at Montclair State University, Upper Montclair, N.J. Jack Ricci of the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey was her mentor while she was a Summer II student. Her research project was titled "Evaluation of a New Biomaterial for Maxillofacial Bone Repair."

Austin Crooks, who resides in Seneca, S.C., is attending Clemson University. Dev Arya, professor at Clemson, was Crooks's mentor during his Summer II experience. His research project was titled "Investigation of RNA Duplex Binding by Aminoglycosides Using CD Spectroscopy."

Paulo Lizano, who resides in Union City, N.J., is a student at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Satyajit Bhattacharya of New York University was his mentor while he was a Summer II Scholar. Lizano's research project was titled "Detection and Characterization of Circulating Cancer Cells from Breast Cancer Patients."

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Sabrina Matheus of Newark, N.J., is a student at Oakwood College, Huntsville, Ala. Golgen Bengu of New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, was her Summer II mentor. Matheus' research project was titled "Chem Laboratory Development via Internet."

Deanna Moorehead from Rochester, N.Y., is a freshman at the University of Pittsburgh. While Moorehead was a Summer II student, Nancy Porter of Eastman Ko-dak was her mentor. Moorehead's research project was titled "Evaluation of an Environmental Sampling Method for Photographic Chemical and Evaluation of Extraction Techniques."

Tin Nguyen of Stockton, Calif., is attending the University of the Pacific, Stockton, Calif. Larry Spreer was his mentor at the University of the Pacific while he was a Summer II Scholar. Nguyen's research project was titled "Preparation of New Semiconductor Materials To Be Tested as Candidates for Fast, Bright Scintillating Crystals for PET Imaging."

Nicole Ortiz of Jersey City, N.J., is a student at Rutgers University, Newark. S. N. Ganguly of Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, was her mentor while she was a Summer II student. Ortiz' research project was titled "Bromination Reactions Using Microwaves."

Karen Phung of Albany, Calif., is a student at the University of California, San Diego, La Jolla. Betty Ishida of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Albany, Calif., was Phung's Summer II mentor. Their research involved culturing plant tissues and organs in vitro, extraction and analysis of compounds from plants, and data evaluation.

Melissa Purpura of Las Cruces, N.M., is a freshman at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. Stephen Starnes of New Mexico State was her mentor while she was a Summer II student there. Her research project was titled "Molecular Recognition of Nucleotides."

Julie Rodriguez of Union City, N.J., is a freshman at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. She worked with Ajay Bose at Stephens Institute of Technology while she was a Summer II student. Her research project was titled "MORE Chemistry: Bromination of Aromatic Compounds."

Hui Wen Tan, who resides in San Francisco, is a freshman at the University of California, Davis. Jerry Oliveras of Aresco Inc. was her mentor while she was a Summer II student. Her research project involved the analysis of proximate composition of various foods.

Thuy Bich Tran of Charlotte, N.C., is a freshman at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Daniel Rabinovich of the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, was his mentor during the Summer II phase. His research project was titled "Synthesis and Characterization of Cadmium, Mercury, and Manganese Complexes of a New Bidentate tert-Butyl Ligand."

Tina Truncellito of North Bergen, N.J., is attending Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Paula Ruiz was her mentor while she was a Summer II student at Hackensack University Medical Center. While there, Truncellito compared peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis to determine which method is more effective for patients who suffer from end-stage renal disease.

Linda Velazquez of Union City, N.J., is a student at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. She was mentored by Mary Hamilton of Fordham University, Bronx, N.Y., while she was a Summer II student. At Fordham, she examined the heat shock protein in oysters.

Robert Woys of Bay City, Mich., is attending Delta College, University Center, Mich. David Karpovich of Saginaw Valley State University was his mentor while he was a Summer II Scholar. Woys's research project was titled "C-13 NMR Spectroscopy toward the Remediation of Heavy-Metal-Contaminated Soils."

Xiu Ying Zheng of Linden, N.J., is a freshman at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Sithes Logendra was her mentor while she was a Summer II student at Rutgers. Her research project was titled "Isolation of Antifungal Compounds from Plant Roots."

 

BAYER SCHOLARS

Bayer Corp. contributed to the Project SEED endowment. Bayer is a research-based company with major businesses in health care and life sciences as well as chemicals and imaging technologies. The firm sponsored four scholarship winners for the 2002–03 academic year.

La'Chelle Bailey of Kansas City, Mo., is a freshman at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. Zhonghua Peng was her mentor while she was a Summer II Scholar. Bailey's research project was titled "Novel Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Materials."

Netasha Clark of Kernersville, N.C., is a student at Salem College, Winston-Salem, N.C. Christa Colyer of Wake Forest University, also in Winston-Salem, was her mentor while Clark was a Summer II student. Clark's study involved the interaction of a near-infrared fluorescent dye, indocyanine green, with various proteins and peptides.

Amita Goyal of Jersey City, N.J., is a freshman at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Luis Avila and John Williams of Columbia University were Goyal's mentors while she was a Summer II student. Goyal's research involved experimentation with techniques to measure iron in seawater.

Anh Tram Tran of Kansas City, Mo., is a freshman at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. Ashim Mitra, also at UMKC, was Tran's Summer II mentor. Tran's research project was titled "Synthesis and Transport of Novel Amino Acid Ester of Acyclovir."

 

ULLYOT SCHOLARS

Glenn Ullyot was an accomplished chemical researcher who worked for Smith, Kline & French Laboratories. He was a major contributor to the discovery and manufacture of new drugs of critical value to the medical world. Barbara Ullyot, his widow, had a management career at ACS and is a member of the society. The Ullyot contribution sponsored two scholarship winners.

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Curtis Deer of Lawrence, Mich., is a student at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo. Subra Muralidharan, professor of chemistry at Western Michigan, was his mentor while he was a Summer II student. Deer's research project was titled "Synthesis and Characterization of the Quantum Dots and Their Potential for Application as Sensors for Environmental Pollutants."

Victor Sanchez of Waukegan, Ill., is a student at the College of Lake County, Grayslake, N.Y. Kenneth Neet of Finch University of Health Sciences, Chicago Medical School, was his mentor while he was a Summer II student. Sanchez' research project involved determination of the effects of various metal ions on the ability of NGF to maintain survival of PC12 cells upon serum withdrawal.

ELIZABETH & STEPHEN BECHTEL JR. FOUNDATION SCHOLARS

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The Bechtels have been residents of the San Francisco Bay Area for many years, and educational programs have been one focus of their giving. In the past decade, their foundation has strongly supported Project SEED with student stipends and scholarships. This year, the foundation sponsored two scholarship winners.

Shaela Stephens-Bold of Berkeley, Calif., is attending Laney College, Oakland, Calif. While Stephens-Bold was a Summer II student, Perrin Selcer of Libby Laboratories was her mentor. Stephens-Bold's research project was focused on the chemical and microbial analysis of cosmetics.

Jamie Martinez of Richmond, Calif., is a student at Contra Costa Community College, San Pablo, Calif. She worked with Tom Schatzki at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Western Regional Research Center, Albany, Calif., while she was a Summer II student. Her research project involved extraction of toxins from individual peanut samples.

 

BURROUGHS WELLCOME FUND SCHOLAR

The Burroughs Wellcome Fund is an independent private foundation dedicated to advancing the medical sciences by supporting research and other scientific and educational activities. Burroughs Wellcome sponsored one student for the 2002–03 year.

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Jessica Thompkins of Durham, N.C., is a freshman at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. Emmanuel Opara of Duke Medical Center, Durham, mentored Thompkins while she was a Summer II student. Her research project was titled "Comparison of Bead Swelling Empty Chelated and Unchelated BaCl2 versus CaCl2 Alginated Microcapsules."

 

WARE BROTHERS SCHOLAR

Christopher and Michael Ware both have engineering backgrounds and have generously supported the Project SEED program since 2001 by increasing the opportunity of underrepresented high school students to study mathematics and science. The Ware brothers sponsored one student for the 2002–03 academic year.

Lucie Chen of San Francisco is a freshman at the University of California, Berkeley. Patrick Morrison of Smith-Emery Co., was her mentor while she was a Summer II student. Chen's research project involved testing building materials.


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ACS seeks applicants for Scholars Program


ACS BOARD STANDING COMMITTEE ROSTERS FOR 2003
Grants & Awards

Stanley C. Israel,chair
Madeleine M. Joullie
C. Gordon McCarty
E. Ann Nalley
Stanley H. Pine
Elsa Reichmanis

Professional & Member Relations

Anne T. O'Brien,chair
James D. Burke
Dennis Chamot
Paul R. Jones
E. Ann Nalley

Eli M. Pearce
Diane Grob Schmidt

Public Affairs & Public Relations

James P. Shoffner,chair
Charles P. Casey
Dennis Chamot
Paul R. Jones
C. Gordon McCarty
Elsa Reichmanis

ACS is seeking applications from minority students for its Scholars Program. The application deadline is Feb. 15. The ACS Scholars Program provides financial support to academically accomplished African American, Hispanic, and Native American students in their pursuit of undergraduate studies in chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry, environmental science, and related disciplines in two- and four-year college and university programs.

Up to 100 scholarships will be awarded to minority students seeking a career in chemistry. Freshmen can receive up to $2,500 per academic year. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors are eligible for up to $3,000 per academic year.

"The American Chemical Society wants to assist students in acquiring skills and credentials needed for success," explains Robert J. Hughes, manager of the program. "The goal of the Scholars Program is to aid in building an awareness of the value and rewards associated with careers in science."

According to the society's ChemCensus report, relatively few minorities major in science-related disciplines at the college level. In 2000, for example, those of Hispanic heritage--12.5% of the U.S. population--represented only 2.6% of the chemistry workforce; African Americans--almost 12% of the population--represented less than 2% of the chemical workforce; and Native Americans--1% of the population--made up less than 1% of the chemical workforce.

In 1995, ACS launched the Scholars Program with a $5 million grant. Since then, companies such as Astra Zeneca, Bayer, DuPont, GlaxoSmithKline, PPG Industries, Procter & Gamble, and Xerox have contributed to the program. These gifts have afforded over 1,100 students the opportunity to study chemistry and related subjects.

In addition to financial aid, the Scholars Program, with the help of participating companies, offers students the opportunity to take advantage of mentoring and paid summer internships.

For more details on the ACS Scholars Program, including an online application form, visit http://chemistry.org/scholars or phone (800) 227-5558 ext. 6250.



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Copyright © 2002 American Chemical Society



 
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