[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Skip to Main Content

Books

August 25, 2008
Volume 86, Number 34
pp. 38-39

Getting A Doctoral Degree

An overview of action and research programs concerning U.S. doctoral education

Reviewed by Arthur B. Ellis

THE DAILY PRESSURES of doctoral programs are such that students and their mentors often lack time for thoughtful reflection on how these programs are structured and what they aspire to achieve. “The Formation of Scholars: Rethinking Doctoral Education for the Twenty-First Century,” by George E. Walker, Chris M. Golde, Laura Jones, Andrea Conklin Bueschel, and Pat Hutchings, provides insightful perspectives on doctoral education in the U.S. The significance of our national investment in this enterprise is reflected in the fact that more than 400 universities award at least 40,000 doctoral degrees annually in the U.S. As the authors note, the doctoral degree has been a path to leadership positions in many fields, and doctoral programs have been engines for innovation.

The Formation of Scholars: Rethinking Doctoral Education for the Twenty-First Century, by George E. Walker, Chris M. Golde, Laura Jones, Andrea Conklin Bueschel, and Pat Hutchings, Jossey-Bass, Prometheus Books, 2008, 232 pages, $40 hardcove (ISBN: 978–0-470–19743–1)

In some respects, the book is an overview of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID), an action and research program concerning doctoral education that spanned the years 2001–05. CID recruited teams of graduate students and faculty from six disciplines—chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience—representing more than 80 university departments and programs