Skip to Main Content

Business Concentrates

Advertisement
Advertise Here
September 12, 2011
Volume 89, Number 37
p. 12

Adidas, Nike, And Puma Commit To Zero Discharge

Jean-François Tremblay

  • Print this article
  • Email the editor

More Business Stories

October 24, 2011

Celanese Takes An Ethanol Plunge (Member Content)

(October 24, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 43 | pp. 20-21)

The chemical producer seeks to make ethanol a major business but is secretive about details of its process.

Building On The Momentum (Member Content)

(October 24, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 43 | p. 22)

BWA Water Additives rides crest of rising demand for specialty water treatment chemicals.

European Firms Invest In China

(October 24, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 43 | p. 6)

Specialty Chemicals: Companies pursue local research and production.

Investors Bet On Cleantech

(October 24, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 43 | p. 9)

Green Chemistry: Close to $1 billion is slated for start-up firms.

Business Concentrates (Member Content)

(October 24, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 43 | p. 18)

 

October 17, 2011

Emerging Strategies

(October 17, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 42 | pp. 15-26)

Faced with change, pharmaceutical firms shift business mix to generics and emerging markets.

A Sense of Urgency (Member Content)

(October 17, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 42 | pp. 30-32)

Call for drug safety pushes the mundane art of supply chain management to the front burner.

Growing Businesses The Scottish Way (Member Content)

(October 17, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 42 | pp. 33-35)

Development authorities seek to harness industry‑academia cooperation in the life sciences.

An Update On Dow (Member Content)

(October 17, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 42 | pp. 36-38)

CEO Andrew N. Liveris believes the major pieces are in place to continue the company's transformation.

AstraZeneca Shifts Operations

(October 17, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 42 | p. 10)

Pharmaceuticals: Firm will add manufacturing in China while cutting jobs in the U.S.

Investment Deterrent

(October 17, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 42 | p. 11)

Venture capital firms say FDA regulations hamper their support of biopharma companies.

Business Concentrates (Member Content)

(October 17, 2011 | Vol. 89 Issue 42 | pp. 28-30)

 

Text Size A A

In response to a challenge posed by the environmental group Greenpeace, sportswear makers Adidas, Nike, and Puma have committed to eliminating all hazardous chemical discharges throughout their supply chains by 2020. Adidas, the last of the three to make the promise, says it took longer to commit to the goal because it wanted to coordinate efforts with others so that environmental responsibility does not turn into a competition. Adidas claims that the pledge will not be difficult to meet because it already sources from companies that comply with its tough environmental requirements. In the future, Adidas says, it will completely phase out use of bioaccumulative and hormone-disrupting substances, including nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactants, in tandem with other sports apparel companies. The firm will also work with others to develop a harmonized system of classifying and labeling chemicals used in sportswear manufacturing. Greenpeace describes Adidas’ pledge as “great news for our environment, our rivers, and the millions of people in China and elsewhere who depend on rivers for drinking water and agriculture.” The activist group will now pressure other clothing makers that depend on external suppliers.

Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © 2011 American Chemical Society
  • Print this article
  • Email the editor

Services & Tools

ACS Resources

ACS is the leading employment source for recruiting scientific professionals. ACS Careers and C&EN Classifieds provide employers direct access to scientific talent both in print and online. Jobseekers | Employers

» Join ACS

Join more than 161,000 professionals in the chemical sciences world-wide, as a member of the American Chemical Society.
» Join Now!