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Cover Story

April 10, 2006
Volume 84, Number 15
pp. 19-27

Pharma Outsourcing

The search for a cure for cancer unites three partnerships between a drug developer and a pharmaceutical chemical company

The advertisements in popular magazines would convince most readers that the pharmaceutical industry is ruled by giant multinational companies focused exclusively on "lifestyle" drugs to fix problems that could be cured through more healthful living.

Scynexis Photo

Reflections Chemist Annette Shaw works up a reaction in Scynexis' Research Triangle Park laboratories.

In fact, much pharmaceutical research is conducted by small companies that many magazine readers have never heard of. And many of the industry's research dollars are spent confronting serious afflictions such as cancer, heart disease, pain, and infection. For example, in the U.S. last year there were 399 drugs in development to treat cancer and 146 for heart disease and stroke, according to Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America.

Here, Assistant Managing Editor Michael McCoy and Associate Editor Lisa M. Jarvis present three case studies of the relationship between a small drug company and a pharmaceutical chemistry provider. Not surprisingly, all involve cancer drugs.

Two of the drugs are still in development, and if history is any guide, one or both of them will fail for one reason or another. Drug development is a high-risk business, but the stories of the scientists who discover and synthesize such compounds are always compelling.

COVER STORY - PHARMA OUTSOURCING

Double Play

A successful contract with a productive drug developer leads to a second piece of business.

Speed Limit

A pharmaceutical company and its chemistry partner scramble when a drug is fast-tracked.

Crossover

The effort to develop a small-molecule follow-on leads to a contract between neighboring firms.

Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © 2010 American Chemical Society

COVER STORY - PHARMA OUTSOURCING

  • Double Play
    A successful contract with a productive drug developer leads to a second piece of business.
  • Speed Limit
    A pharmaceutical company and its chemistry partner scramble when a drug is fast-tracked.
  • Crossover
    The effort to develop a small-molecule follow-on leads to a contract between neighboring firms.

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