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October 27, 2010

And The Winners Are...

Photo contest draws lively response and cool images from C&EN readers

That's Conical! Drexel University materials science graduate student Jennifer S. Atchison made the silicon nanocones shown in this scanning electron microscope image by decomposing silane at high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition apparatus. Jennifer S. Atchison
That's Conical! Drexel University materials science graduate student Jennifer S. Atchison made the silicon nanocones shown in this scanning electron microscope image by decomposing silane at high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition apparatus.
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C&EN called on chemistry shutterbugs to participate in its inaugural photo contest and readers responded enthusiastically, submitting nearly 250 images on all things chemical. Connected loosely by the broad theme "Your Science Up Close," the photos in this collection range from the macroscopic to the microscopic and from the everyday lab scene to the "that wasn't supposed to happen." Congratulations!

Second Place

WATER VORTEX A magnetic stirrer, a beaker of water, and colored paper were all Robert L. D'Ordine, a biochemist in Ballwin, Mo., needed to capture this familiar laboratory phenomenon. Robert L. D'Ordine
WATER VORTEX A magnetic stirrer, a beaker of water, and colored paper were all Robert L. D'Ordine, a biochemist in Ballwin, Mo., needed to capture this familiar laboratory phenomenon. "I would watch the vortex form as the stirrer sped up. Sometimes it was quite relaxing," D'Ordine says.

Third Place

POLYCHROMATIC As an undergraduate, Ryan O'Donnell, now at Johns Hopkins University, studied explosives with ion mobility spectrometry. The colorful birefringence pattern in this image comes from examining a micrometer-sized ammonium nitrate crystallite via cross-polarization light microscopy. Ryan O'Donnell
POLYCHROMATIC As an undergraduate, Ryan O'Donnell, now at Johns Hopkins University, studied explosives with ion mobility spectrometry. The colorful birefringence pattern in this image comes from examining a micrometer-sized ammonium nitrate crystallite via cross-polarization light microscopy.

Honorable Mention

Marjorie S. Austero (left), Keith Fahnestock (right)
TWO OF A KIND In the Natural Polymers & Photonics Laboratory at Drexel University, researchers convert polysaccharides into nanofibers and thin films for use in water purification and other applications. In Marjorie S. Austero's experiment, adding excess cross-linker to chitosan yielded the fine-fibered material seen in the colored SEM image (left). Keith J. Fahnestock's chitosan-electrospinning run (results shown above at right) didn't go as planned. Rather than generating nanoscale fibers, the experiment produced micrometer-sized blobs. "In science, never cry over spilled milk. Take a picture of it instead," Fahnestock suggests.

Honorable Mention

CHEMISTRY THOUGHT BUBBLES Putting a literal twist on a comic-strip illustrator's device, University of Rochester grad student Karen Chiang focused her thoughts on Karen Chiang
CHEMISTRY THOUGHT BUBBLES Putting a literal twist on a comic-strip illustrator's device, University of Rochester grad student Karen Chiang focused her thoughts on "Nontraditional Careers for Chemists" by Lisa M. Balbes by photographing the book cover through a bubble-filled glass of water.
CHEMISTRY BLUES Looking at inorganic compounds doesn't usually put chemists in a musical kind of mood. But there can be exceptions. Philip J. Squattrito
CHEMISTRY BLUES Looking at inorganic compounds doesn't usually put chemists in a musical kind of mood. But there can be exceptions. "Solid vanadyl sulfate is one of the bluest compounds I know," wails Philip J. Squattrito, a chemistry professor at Central Michigan University.
TINY BUBBLES Thomas Lazzara, a Ph.D. student at the University of Göttingen's Institute for Organic &
Biomolecular Chemistry, in Germany, captured the image
below of vesicles fluorescently labeled with Texas Red and filled with sucrose as they sank to the bottom of a petri dish filled with a low-density buffer. Thomas Lazzara
TINY BUBBLES Thomas Lazzara, a Ph.D. student at the University of Göttingen's Institute for Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, in Germany, captured the image below of vesicles fluorescently labeled with Texas Red and filled with sucrose as they sank to the bottom of a petri dish filled with a low-density buffer.

Click on the winning entries tab to view enlarged images

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Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © 2011 American Chemical Society
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FIRST PLACE: That's Conical! - Jennifer S. Atchison

That's Conical! Jennifer S. Atchison

Drexel University materials science graduate student Jennifer S. Atchison made the silicon nanocones shown in this scanning electron microscope image by decomposing silane at high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition apparatus.

SECOND PLACE: Water Vortex - Robert L. D'Ordine

Water Vortex Robert L. D'Ordine

A magnetic stirrer, a beaker of water, and colored paper were all Robert L. D'Ordine, a biochemist in Ballwin, Mo., needed to capture this familiar laboratory phenomenon. "I would watch the vortex form as the stirrer sped up. Sometimes it was quite relaxing," D'Ordine says.

THIRD PLACE: Polychromatic - Ryan O'Donnell

Polychromatic Ryan O'Donnell

As an undergraduate, Ryan O'Donnell, now at Johns Hopkins University, studied explosives with ion mobility spectrometry. The colorful birefringence pattern in this image comes from examining a micrometer-sized ammonium nitrate crystallite via cross-polarization light microscopy.

HONORABLE MENTION: Two Of A Kind - Marjorie S. Austero

Two of a Kind

Two of a Kind Marjorie S. Austero (top), Keith Fahnestock (bottom)

In the Natural Polymers & Photonics Laboratory at Drexel University, researchers convert polysaccharides into nanofibers and thin films for use water purification and other applications. In Marjorie S. Austero's experiment, adding excess cross-linker to chitosan yielded the fine-fibered material seen in the colored SEM image (top). Keith J. Fahnestock's chitosan-electrospinning run (results shown at bottom) didn't go as planned. Rather than generating nanoscale fibers, the experiment produced micrometer-sized blobs. "In science, never cry over spilt milk. Take a picture of it instead," Fahnestock suggests.

HONORABLE MENTION: Chemistry Blues - Phil Squattrito

Chemistry Blues Phil Squattrito

Looking at inorganic compounds doesn't usually put chemists in a musical kind of mood. But there can be exceptions. "Solid vanadyl sulfate is one of the bluest compounds I know," wails Philip J. Squattrito, a chemistry professor at Central Michigan University.

HONORABLE MENTION: Tiny Bubbles - Thomas Lazzara

Tiny Bubbles Thomas Lazzara

Thomas Lazzara, a Ph.D. student at Georg August University's GÖttingen Institute for Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry in Germany, captured this image of vesicles fluorescently labeled with Texas Red and filled with sucrose as they sank to the bottom of a petri dish filled with a low-density buffer.

HONORABLE MENTION: Chemistry Thought Bubbles - Karen Chiang

Chemistry Thought Bubbles Karen Chiang

Putting a literal twist on a comic strip illustrator's device, University of Rochester grad student Karen Chiang focused her thoughts on "Nontraditional Careers for Chemists" by Lisa M. Balbes by photographing the book cover through a bubble-filled glass of water.

Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © 2011 American Chemical Society
  • Print this article
  • Email the editor

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