How to Advertise
Home | This Week's Contents  |  C&EN ClassifiedsSearch C&EN Online

 
Millennium Special Report
C&EN 75th Anniversary Issue
 
Related Stories
ACC TESTS NEW AD IMAGE PROGRAM
[C&EN, May 14, 2001]

CHANGES AHEAD FOR CHEMICAL CONTROL LAWS?
[C&EN, April 2, 2001 ]

CHEMICAL FIRMS FACE FULL PLATE OF ISSUES
[C&EN, June 18 , 2001]

Industry trade groups to stay separate
[C&EN, May 24, 1999]

Related Sites
American Chemistry Council (ACC)

American Plastics Council (APC)

Society of the Plastics Industry

E-mail this article to a friend
Print this article
E-mail the editor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Table of Contents
 C&EN Classifieds
 News of the Week
 Cover Story
 Editor's Page
 Business
 Government & Policy
 Science/Technology
 Concentrates
  Business
  Government & Policy
  Science/Technology
 Education
 ACS News
 Calendars
 Books
 Digital Briefs
 ACS Comments
 Career & Employment
 Special Reports
 Letters
 Awards
 Newscripts
 Nanotechnology
 What's That Stuff?
 Pharmaceutical Century

 Hot Articles
 Safety  Letters
 Chemcyclopedia

 Back Issues

 How to Subscribe
 Subscription Changes
 About C&EN
 Copyright Permission
 E-mail webmaster
NEWS OF THE WEEK
BUSINESS VOICES
July 2, 2001
Volume 79, Number 27
CENEAR 79 27 p.6
ISSN 0009-2347
[Previous Story] [Next Story]

INDUSTRY GROUPS CONSIDER MERGER
Combination may strengthen chemicals and plastics lobby

ALEX TULLO

Countless chemicals and plastics mergers over the past few years tapped into the synergies of integrating two large organizations. Now, two leading industry trade groups--the American Chemistry Council (ACC) and the American Plastics Council (APC)--are considering doing the same.

Am.Plastics.LogoVBl
7844bus20x.ce
Terry F. Yosie, vice president of strategic communications at ACC, confirms that the two trade groups are studying an alliance. "The CEOs of the member companies are looking for ways to improve the efficiencies and effectiveness of the two organizations," he says.

Yosie says a merger isn't the only option available to the two organizations. ACC and APC now share common financial and human resource services, and the two could decide to have more of these kinds of arrangements.

But the synergies between APC and ACC may be more than just administrative. APC and ACC usually fight side by side on key issues such as railroad regulation and use of polyvinyl chloride and other plastics. Moreover, almost all of APC's 23 members are major polymer suppliers that are also members of ACC.

Yosie says ACC also would like to tap into the success that APC has had in improving the public image of plastics. "APC's communications have been very effective," he comments. ACC has launched an ad campaign aimed at casting chemicals in a better light, in addition to changing its name from the more industrial-sounding Chemical Manufacturers Association.

APC likewise believes in strength in numbers. In 1999, it negotiated a merger with the Society of the Plastics Industry (SPI), which represents hundreds of polymer processors, equipment makers, and other companies in the plastics business. But a full merger never got off the ground. "Unlike ACC, the alignment in membership wasn't quite the same with SPI," an APC spokeswoman says.

[Previous Story] [Next Story]



Top


Chemical & Engineering News
Copyright © 2001 American Chemical Society


How to Advertise
Home | Table of Contents | News of the Week | Cover Story
Business | Government & Policy | Science/Technology
Chemical & Engineering News
Copyright © 2000 American Chemical Society - All Right Reserved
1155 16th Street NW • Washington DC 20036 • (202) 872-4600 • (800) 227-5558


CASChemPortChemCenterPubs Page