Home | This Week's Contents  |  C&EN ClassifiedsSearch C&EN Online

 
Millennium Special Report
C&EN 75th Anniversary Issue
 
Related Stories
QUALIFIED PRAISE FOR STEM CELL DECISION
[C&EN, Aug. 20, 2001]

EMBRYO STEM CELLS AND RESEARCH
[C&EN, July 16, 2001]

GENOMICS ADVANCES
[C&EN, July 9, 2001]

PANEL CONSIDERS STEM CELL RULES
[C&EN, April 26, 1999]

Related Sites
Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF)

NIH

Geron Corp.

American Association for the Advancement of Science

E-mail this article to a friend
Print this article
E-mail the editor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Table of Contents
 C&EN Classifieds
 News of the Week
 Cover Story
 Editor's Page
 Business
 Government & Policy
 Science/Technology
 Concentrates
  Business
  Government & Policy
  Science/Technology
 Education
 ACS News
 Calendars
 Books
 Digital Briefs
 ACS Comments
 Career & Employment
 Special Reports
 Letters
 Awards
 People
 Meetings
 Newscripts
 Nanotechnology
 What's That Stuff?
 Pharmaceutical Century

 Hot Articles
 Safety  Letters
 Chemcyclopedia

 Back Issues

 How to Subscribe
 Subscription Changes
 About C&EN
 Copyright Permission
 E-mail webmaster
NEWS OF THE WEEK
SCIENCE POLICY
August 27
, 2001
Volume 79, Number 35
CENEAR 79 35 p. 14
ISSN 0009-2347
[Previous Story] [Next Story]

STEM CELL ANGST
Patent and licensing issues gum up stem cell development

DAVID HANSON, C&EN WASHINGTON

Concerns about the availability and usefulness of existing embryonic stem cell lines continue to surface in the wake of President George W. Bush's decision to allow limited federal support of the research.

An NIH spokesman says the agency has begun meeting with all the holders of derived cell lines to get details on them and discuss their availability. The purpose is to prepare a complete registry of the cell lines. How soon this important information will be available is unknown, the spokesman says.

The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), which holds a primary patent on production of human embryonic stem cells, is one of the institutions negotiating with NIH (see page 6). WARF has given an exclusive license to some stem cell lines to Geron Corp., Menlo Park, Calif.

Geron provided much of the financial support for the University of Wisconsin researcher, James Thomson, who developed the stem cell lines. WARF awarded the company commercialization rights for six cell lines: hepatocytes, myocytes, neural cells, pancreatic islet cells, hematopoietic cells, and osteoblasts. Geron says it has the rights to other WARF stem cell lines as well.

However, the university recently filed a lawsuit against Geron seeking to preserve what it says are its rights to license other cell lines to other entities. WARF and Geron expect to resolve the licensing issue in the near future.

Meanwhile, researchers are still questioning the President's statement that 60 embryonic stem cell lines are available. The American Association for the Advancement of Science, for example, sent a stern letter to the Administration demanding that it publicly disclose details of all the cell lines. AAAS says scientists need to know how the lines were developed, their genetic and geographic diversity, and who controls access to them, among other things, before decisions can be made.

[Previous Story] [Next Story]



Top


Chemical & Engineering News
Copyright © 2001 American Chemical Society


Home | Table of Contents | News of the Week | Cover Story
Business | Government & Policy | Science/Technology
Chemical & Engineering News
Copyright © 2001 American Chemical Society - All Right Reserved
1155 16th Street NW • Washington DC 20036 • (202) 872-4600 • (800) 227-5558


CASChemPortChemCenterPubs Page