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Table of Contents

November 1999
Volume 8, Number 11

FEATURES

40 Using Neural Networks
These programs can be taught to think like chemists about some kinds of problems.
Hank Simon
44 LIMS in Transition: The Impact of Market Volatility
The mergers-and-acquisitions frenzy reflects a renewed focus on vertical markets.
Helen Gillespie

DEPARTMENTS

7 For Openers
A Modern Major Chemical
James F. Ryan
9 Letters
Feedback from our readers
12 Update
News in brief: business, government, science
19 Computers in Chemistry
Learning From Nature
Genetic algorithms can be used to quantify traditional trial-and-error learning methods.
Ronald E. Shaffer and Gary W. Small
29 Lab Products Notebook
The Drive To Improve the Bottom Line
Automating the process development laboratory is key to future profitability.
Kathy Conner
35 Workplace Perspectives
Bringing Out the Best in Your Team
As manager, it's your responsibility to develop your staff's potential.
John K. Borchardt
39 Keeping Up
Meetings, conferences, and short courses
49 The Chemist's Bookshelf
Fearless Leaders and Fuzzy Logic
Robert W. Gerlach and George B. Kauffman
51 Industry Today
More, Faster . . . Better?
The pharmaceutical companies can learn from the semiconductor industry.
Hank Simon
55 Health Perspectives
Can Alcohol Protect Your Heart?
The pros and cons of moderate drinking
Mary Ann Ryan
61 Personal Business
Living Trusts: A Way to Meet Estate Planning Goals
Also: Your home as a retirement asset
Dickinson J. Miller
65 Regulations and You
FQPA: Much Ado About Next to Nothing
In measuring pesticides, to ppb or not to ppb, that is the question.
Roger A. Novak
71 The Way We Were
An Officer and a Chemist
At West Point, chemistry is a corps subject.
James M. Schmidt
75 Profiles in Chemistry
Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin
Combining crystallography and computers
Christopher S. W. Koehler
78 Product Information
New products, literature, and Web sites
84 Lighter Elements
Humorous tales from readers' labs and lives . . . plus a cartoon.