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December 20, 2004

CHEMISTRY HIGHLIGHTS 2004

Key advances were made this year in areas ranging from biochemistry, drug research, and analysis to nanotech and inorganic chemistry.

2004 INDUSTRY REVIEW

The upturn is no longer elusive, and although challenges remain, prosperity is finally returning to the chemical industry.

December 13, 2004

ACS Takes Legal Action Against Google

Google search service is said to infringe SciFinder Scholar

National Chemistry Week

This year's activities centered around the theme of "Health and Wellness."

December 6, 2004

PHARMA REVIEW

Competition from generics, pricing pressures, cost containment, and regulatory issues are among the problems the pharmaceutical industry is facing.

CONTRACT RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS

CROs provide essential services and adapt to fit changing needs of pharmaceutical firms.

November 29, 2004

HUBBLE TELESCOPE

After 15 years, the aging instrument needs a serious tune-up, but the shuttle fleet that would do it is grounded.

DISPUTED HISTORY

Elias J. Corey's claim to have originated the idea behind the Woodward-Hoffmann rules is unfair, Roald Hoffmann says.

November 22, 2004

METABOLIC SYNDROME

Complex set of disorders offers drug development opportunities; a new NMR technique measures low-density lipoproteins.

November 15, 2004

ACADEMIC R&D

Latest NSF data from 2002 show marked growth in funding for chemical research.

November 8, 2004

RENEWABLE RESOURCES

Increases in the price of oil may drive specialty chemicals into a postpetroleum era.

November 1, 2004

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK

Amid record-high unemployment for chemists, C&EN offers advice on a new job hunt, midcareer transitions, and temporary jobs, as well as a salary review and information on job resources.

October 25, 2004

DIABETES DRUGS

Treatment paradigm involving peptide hormone receptor promises new hope for therapy.

October 18, 2004

PAINTS & COATINGS

Markets shift, regulations tighten, and the industry looks toward new technologies.

CHLORINE

C. T. Howlett Jr. and Terrence Collins debate chlorine's positive and negative contributions.

DREAM JOBS

C&EN examines what makes some companies leaders in employee relations.

October 11, 2004

PROCESS CHEMICALS

Specialty chemical strategies for the 21st century are clearly emerging in the concrete, dyes, paper, and leather

industries.

October 4, 2004

OCEAN ENERGY

Entrepreneurs hope to market clean, affordable electricity from the power of tides, waves, or any water in motion.

COMBICHEM

Modeled after natural products, diversity-oriented synthesis gives hope to a field in need of a boost.

MEDICAL DEVICES

Chemical engineers, like chemists, are in demand in this industry, which is thriving in New England.

September 27, 2004

HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING

Demand for computers of all sizes and designs is continually increasing for all kinds of problems in chemistry.

ACADEMIC SCORECARD

Women continue to be underrepresented in the faculty of top 50 chemistry departments.

September 20, 2004

STRUCTURAL PROTEOMICS

Biotechnology companies try to meet demand for contract research in this dynamic market.

POSTDOCTORAL EXPERIENCE

Four-part supplement discusses the challenges and opportunities facing today's postdocs, as well as a new education standardization in Europe.

September 13, 2004

NUCLEAR ENERGY

Next generations of reactors will have evolutionary and revolutionary designs.

September 6, 2004

FINE CHEMICALS

Suzuki coupling and related chemistries gain ground in commercial practice, from small-scale synthesis to industrial-scale production.

August 30, 2004

ADVANCED COMPOSITES

By blending distinct components, researchers make materials for auto, aerospace, defense, and other industries.

August 23, 2004

AGING

Scientists attempt to understand the triggers, timing, and molecular basis of this inevitable condition.

August 16, 2004

EMPLOYMENT & SALARY SURVEY

The job market for chemists continues to be difficult, but salaries have improved.

August 9, 2004

CARBOHYDRATE VACCINES

Novel techniques for constructing and synthesizing antigenic carbohydrates are making possible a new generation of vaccines.

August 2, 2004

DAVID KAY

Former head of CIA's weapons investigation group in Iraq discusses the lessons learned from the search for weapons of mass destruction.

July 26, 2004

DRUG DISCOVERY

Realism replaces hype as research scientists put high-throughput screening methods in their place.

July 19, 2004

GLOBAL TOP 50

Worldwide sales show a striking increase, but profits continue to slip.

CHEMRAWN XV

Conference in Paris spotlights chemistry???s global role in attaining safe and reliable water supplies.

COURTING CHEMISTS

Chemists' expertise is sought by medical device industry.

July 12, 2004

GREEN CHEMISTRY HONORS

Presidential honors recognize innovative chemical products and processes that prevent pollution.

July 5, 2004

FACTS & FIGURES

Chemical industry data for 2003 do not look very different from those of 2002--yet cost-cutting reorganizations of the previous few years are affecting the bottom line.

June 28, 2004

ELECTRONIC CHEMICALS

Sparked by higher demand, such as flat-screen TVs, the semiconductor materials business is booming once again as environmental concerns increase.

June 21, 2004

SOLAR ENERGY

With scientific breakthroughs on the horizon and production costs dropping, advocates say solar energy is on the cusp of a huge expansion.

WHAT'S THAT STUFF?

No-calorie sugar substitutes have sweetening powers hundreds of times that of sucrose.

June 14, 2004

CHIRAL CHEMISTRY

Traditional methods thrive because numerous hurdles, including tough luck, slow down the commercialization of catalytic processes.

WORLDWIDE SCIENCE

Growth in scientific papers is mostly in Europe and Asia.

June 7, 2004

BHOPAL

Twenty years later, Responsible Care has changed industry's approach to safety; third-party audits could help regain the public's trust.

CHEMISTS OF THE CARIBBEAN

Chemistry in the West Indies flourishes despite infrastructure and funding issues.

FLAVORS & FRAGRANCES

Chemists' work combines biology, chemistry, and psychology to create tempting products.

May 31, 2004

CONTROLLING MAD COW DISEASE

Malady presents a difficult regulatory challenge, in part because of gaps in the science of prion diseases.

THREE RINGS

Mix-and-heat strategy yields Borromean rings.

May 24, 2004

ANTIVIRAL DRUGS

Despite biological and economic challenges, a number of strategies are in the pipeline to fight viral respiratory infections.

MASS SPEC ASSAY

Strategy for rapid screening of chemical libraries yields inhibitor of anthrax toxin.

May 17, 2004

TOP 50 U.S. CHEMICAL PRODUCERS

C&EN's annual survey finds economic recovery lifting sales and profits, but a lack of deal making leaves the ranking little changed.

Killing Fat

Antiangiogenesis strategy targets fat cells and returns overfed mice to normal weight.

May 10, 2004

PROTEIN DRUGS

Rapid transformation in business and research has turned large drug firms into biotech players, while contract service firms move into life-cycle management.

May 3, 2004

PERSONAL CARE

Cosmetic makers seek new ingredients and formulations to mitigate effects of aging; FDA scrutinizes claims of therapeutic benefits.

COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY

Techniques are incorporated into the routine work of drug discovery.

April 26, 2004

CARBOHYDRATE CALCULATIONS

Despite their complexity, carbohydrates are finally yielding to the power of computational chemistry.

ETHICS EDUCATION

Colleges make an effort to fit research ethics into the curriculum.

WHAT'S THAT STUFF?

Kitty litter choices range from simple clays to silica gels to plant-derived alternatives.

April 19, 2004

SPECIALTY CHEMICALS

Key players explain how they have adapted to succeed in changing markets.

2003 STARTING SALARY SURVEY

Job market is still soft, median salaries have dropped, and number of unemployed has held steady.

April 12, 2004

NANOTECH IP

Broad potential of this "next big thing" has early developers looking to protect their intellectual property.

NANOTECHNOLOGY

Four Scientists offer advice on how to be a megastar employee in a nanoworld.

SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING

Treasury office concedes that regulations on sanctioned countries do not involve U.S. publishing.

April 5, 2004

PHARMA OUTSOURCING

Four case studies of outsourcing relationships show that good service is rewarded with repeat business.

NANOKIDS

Project uses "character" molecules to draw students into science.

WHAT'S THAT STUFF?

Special adhesive developed by 3M has led to ubiquitous and indispensable sticky notes.

March 29, 2004

2004 PRIESTLEY MEDALIST

Nobel Prize winner E. J. Corey is honored for his profound contributions to organic chemistry and biomedical sciences.

DOWN THE YANGTZE

C&EN's Asia-Pacific correspondent reports on today's China as he continues down the Yangtze River.

AHA! MOMENTS: ROBERT R. BREAKER

Why doesn't nature use RNA molecules to sense specific metabolites and thus regulate gene expression? Nature does, Breaker thought, but no one realized it.

March 22, 2004

DATA MANAGEMENT

Amid a deluge of collected facts and figures, the chemical and pharmaceutical industries seek new information technology solutions.

CRITTER CHEMISTRY

A powerful neurotoxin from puffer fish provides pain relief for some cancer patients.

BIRTH OF A DRUG

Chemists in a variety of subdisciplines team with other scientists in the making of a new drug.

DOWN THE YANGTZE

Join C&EN's Asia-Pacific correspondent on his monthlong river journey to experience today's China.

March 15, 2004

PETROCHEMICALS

North American producers adjust to a changed industry, European producers consolidate, and Japanese producers receive a respite.

March 8, 2004

NITRIC OXIDE'S NEW PLAYER?

Researchers explore the chemistry of NO's biological alter ego, HNO.

March 1, 2004

DRUG DELIVERY

Companies emphasize products over platforms and are positioning their technologies earlier in the drug development timeline.

FORENSIC SCIENCE

It may not be as dramatic as popular TV shows portray, but painstaking chemical analysis is still an exciting career.

February 23, 2004

CLEAN COAL

New technologies promise to deliver more electricity with zero emissions. So why aren't they catching on?

MIDWEST BIOTECH

With links to agriculture and medical devices, biotechnology holds tremendous promise for the Midwest.

February 16, 2004

PHARMA INDUSTRY

Major drug firms battle slump in new drug introductions by reorganizing and absorbing new tools for discovery and development; companies also face external pressures on the public, political, and regulatory fronts.

TRADING PLACES

In 2002, more Ph.D. graduates studied chemistry-related fields rather than "classic" chemistry, more were women, and more were minorities.

February 9, 2004

DEPRESSION

Although depression is not completely understood, great strides have been made with various pharmaceuticals to treat this multifaceted disorder.

TWO NEW ELEMENTS

In Russia, an international research team has synthesized elements 113 and 115.

February 2, 2004

DIAMOND SYNTHESIS

Man-made gem is more than just another pretty face; its remarkable properties offer much for materials applications.

PACIFIC PARADISE

Good living conditions and a rise in hiring attract people to schools in the Northwest.

January 26, 2004

SOAPS AND DETERGENTS

Suppliers rethink strategies for active ingredient development, surfactant producers scramble to restructure, and more firms turn to the Internet for collaboration.

January 19, 2004

CUSTOM CHEMICALS

Companies grapple with how best to supply the pharma industry, as technology no longer provides an easy differentiator and Asian competition grows.

WHAT'S THAT STUFF?

Techniques for making or faking snow provide year-round fun.

January 12, 2004

WORLD CHEMICAL OUTLOOK

Global chemical industry looks forward to a year of growth in most regions, following increases in production and demand.

CRITTER CHEMISTRY

The homely naked mole-rat may prove attractive for pain research.

MATERIALS SCIENCE EXHIBITION

Traveling science museum and website provide interactive experiences with modern materials.

January 5, 2004

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

ACS President Charles P. Casey addresses the many challenges facing chemists and how to convert these challenges into opportunities.

CHEMICAL TECHNICIANS

Technicians have become an integral part of both process and research labs.

WHAT'S THAT STUFF?

Champagne's characteristic effervescence is caused by fermentation and governed by Henry's law.

This page updated December 20, 2004

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