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NEWS OF THE WEEK
PUBLISHING
July 9, 2001
Volume 79, Number 28
CENEAR 79 28 p.12
ISSN 0009-2347
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ACS NAMES EDITOR FOR NEW JOURNAL
William S. Hancock to take the helm at the Journal of Proteome Research

SOPHIE WILKINSON

William S. Hancock, vice president of proteomics at mass spectrometry instrument supplier Thermo Finnigan, has been appointed editor of the American Chemical Society's new Journal of Proteome Research. The journal will be published six times annually beginning early next year. It will cover both the theory and practice of proteomics research, which concerns the global view of the expression, interaction, and modification of proteins in an organism.

PROTEOMICS Hancock hopes the new journal will take the lid off the black box of biology.
COURTESY OF THERMO FINNIGAN
Hancock hopes the publication will encourage a more disciplined approach to the study of living systems and the application of such research. "Biology is still a black box and so the drug development process is still hit and miss," he says. He believes that characterizing all of the proteins in cells will take the mystery out of the system.

John R. Yates III, a proteomics expert and associate professor of cell biology at Scripps Research Institute, applauds Hancock's selection because "he is highly respected in the field of analytical chemistry and has been a pioneer in the separation and characterization of biomolecules."

Hancock also has considerable publishing experience, having been an associate editor at Analytical Chemistry for almost a decade and having served on the board of such publications as the Journal of Chromatography.

Hancock earned a B.Sc. in chemistry and biochemistry in 1966, a Ph.D. in chemistry in 1970, and a D.Sc. in biological analysis in 1993, all at the University of Adelaide, South Australia. He conducted his postdoctoral work in 1970–71 with P. Roy Vagelos at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. He then joined the faculty in the department of chemistry, biochemistry, and biophysics at New Zealand's Massey University.

In the mid-1980s, he returned to the U.S. as a senior scientist in medicinal and analytical chemistry at Genentech. He founded the firm's analytical department and rose to the position of staff scientist. In 1994, he moved to HP Laboratories as a principal scientist for its life sciences initiative. Two years later, he took on an adjunct professorship at Yale University. He joined Thermo Finnigan last year from Agilent Laboratories, which had been spun off from HP. When he's not at work, Hancock can be found painting watercolors, playing tennis, or jogging.

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